Hindi imposition row clarified Nagaland School Education under National Education Policy 2020

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With reference to media reports regarding the Hindi imposition row citing the statement of the Union Home Minister, Amit Shah that all the eight North East States have agreed to make Hindi compulsory up to Class X, Principal Director, School Education, Shanavas C through a press release clarified that:

The State of Nagaland follows three language formula up to class VIII and Hindi is offered as a compulsory language subject up to class 8. In classes 9 & 10, the students have the liberty to study either Hindi or any Modern Indian Language (Ao/Bengali/Lotha/Sumi/Tenyidie) or Alternative English as the Second Language.

The National Education Policy 2020 advocates adopting three language policy up to secondary, but it does not impose any language on States. As per NEP 2020, the three languages learned by children will be the choices of states, regions, and of course the students themselves. The timeline for the implementation of NEP 2020 is within 2030 and the Ministry of Education has not issued any instructions for making Hindi compulsory in the Secondary stage.

Policy No 4.13 of the National Education Policy 2020, which describes the three language policy is reproduced below.

“4.13. The three-language formula will continue to be implemented while keeping in mind the Constitutional provisions, aspirations of the people, regions, and the Union, and the need to promote multilingualism as well as promote national unity. However, there will be greater flexibility in the three-language formula, and no language will be imposed on any State. The three languages learned by children will be the choices of States, regions, and of course, the students themselves, so long as at least two of the three languages are native to India. In particular, students who wish to change one or more of the three languages they are studying may do so in Grade 6 or 7, as long as they can demonstrate basic proficiency in three languages (including one language of India at the literature level) by the end of secondary school.”